Thursday, August 16, 2007

New Hope For Our Slow Internet Connections

It is generally acknowledged that competition tends to make market players improve on the quality of the products and services that they offer to the public. Take for example the entry of Sun Cellular which has made possible the unlimited texts and unlimited calls promo that until now is in effect.

Furthermore, even those paying low monthly postpaid plans are now being given new phones (not the cheap models, mind you), just to renew their subscriptions.

In the broadband industry, things seem to be growing slowly for reasons that are difficult to unknown to me. Well, that easily change if Meralco (in the NCR) and the different power distribution cooperatives/companies (in the province) will take on this one.

BROADBAND THROUGH POWER LINES.
This simply means that any household that has electrical power is Internet ready. I've heard that demos of this technology has been made in the Philippines and it really works. I've also been told that there are some South East Asian countries that are already using this technology.

It is quite difficult to get Meralco to partner with us on this one. They will probably want to go into this all by themselves. But if we have the money, we can surely get some electric cooperatives in the provinces to get into this business. After all, there will be no need to install consumer lines.

3 comments:

Junelle said...

try iloilo :P
I hope Ileco would allow that :)

jc said...

layo para saken... :) I can probably help those who would like to set it over there.

bratyfly said...

hi ulit :)
for this tecnology, we will be using our existing electrical lines to network computers/devices. but in order to establsih a network we need powerline adapters. the electrical wire will only be used as substitute utp cables. to get internet access, we still need internet service provider which maybe thru satellite or copper lnes connection from your home to the internet provider

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